Ferry from Portsmouth to La Rochelle

I was acquainted with RM 890 on the occasion of this conveying from Portsmouth (Great Britain) to La Rochelle, carried out on behalf of the fora marine shipyard. I discovered a small boat as sympathetic as its allure left him to think. The fittings are as coherent as they are bright, while in this monokeel and bi-saffron version the performances are at the rendezvous (7.5 at 8 knots at reaching in 15-18 knots of wind). One weak point in my eyes, the drawing of the cockpit, where due to a little low hilory and lack of Central footrests I had trouble to really ask myself.

Gosport, at breakfast time (photo F. Augendre)

While a ridge stretched over the channel and the Bay of Biscay, this navigation proved to be a relative rest (cold of beggars, but low to moderate bearing winds). This was not to mention the unlikely coincidence of three encounters with fishing gear (in service or not). The misadventures began halfway between England and the French coasts, when a fishing Orin caught in the propeller. So close to the rail of the freighters, and in quasi-absence of wind, there was no other choice but to dive. This is the moment when one is pleased to always have a mask in its conveyor bag… and where we promise to add a wetsuit in the future.

Glad to have overcome it (photo F. Augendre)

A few miles from the entrance to the channel of the furnace, this time it is a net or a locker “active” that we hung, at night, in the keel and the rudders. All manoeuvres (sailing) to pull out of the trap will be futile, until the current is reversed, which will allow the boat to release itself almost miraculously. Never two without three… Two hours from La Rochelle, in the Pertuis Breton, and always at night, the chance placed a buoy of locker pile on our road. Will fishermen someday equip their fishing gear with light tracking devices?